How Headlines Attract and Engage An Audience

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Headlines attract and engage an audience. The challenge is we have a few seconds to capture someone’s attention online.

You have amazing ideas to share, services to offer, or products to sell.

No doubt, your offer provides a solution…

  • in less time
  • with less pain (pain is simply a problem)
  • that lowers cost
  • that increases revenue
  • or provides better results

You’re helping individuals avoid negative setbacks or move toward something positive.

A well-crafted headline can help.

 

 

It’s Time to Raise Some Eyebrows!

An eyebrow is a copy term.

These two or three words (or descriptive keyword phrase) appears above the headline to attract a specific audience.

Typically the eyebrow is used in a landing page (or sales page), but depending on your Opt-in, you could consider an eyebrow if it makes sense for your business.

Here an example, Anti-aging Breakthrough. 

This eyebrow isn’t a headline. It merely attracts people who are concerned about wrinkles.

If they click on the offer, they’re prequalified warm prospects.

Note that the “eyebrow” also evokes curiosity.

 

5 Tips About Headlines

We had to write headlines in school, but headlines in your opt-in have a key role.

Craft a headline that will capture and compel the person to keep reading.

Here are a few headline tips to remember

  1. Provide a benefit.
  2. Be specific and not vague.
  3. Write to be clear and not clever.
  4. Attract the right audience.
  5. Evoke curiosity.

 

When Should I Use a Subheadline?

When I critique headlines, I’ve noticed a common struggle. It’s hard to say everything in one sentence.

You end up with a congested headline.

You can add a subheadline to break up the text. The subheadline appears right below the headline but in a smaller font.

Here are three ways a subheadline can support your headline.

  1. It helps decongest the headline-making it easier to read.
  2. You elaborate on the main benefit.
  3. Your audience is drawn deeper and led to action.

The Difference Between a Headline, Subheadline, and Tagline

A tagline is often confused with a headline.

A tagline is a catchphrase or jingle.

Five elements of a tagline.

  1. Sets a tone
  2. Tell others what you’re known for
  3. Makes you memorable
  4. It’s repeated often
  5. Contains less than eight words

 

Here are examples of taglines.

Apple: “Think Different.”

Bounty: “The Quicker Picker Upper” …

Lay’s: “Betcha Can’t Eat Just One.”

Nike: “Just Do It.”

L’Oréal: “Because You’re Worth It.” …

 

You can see that the headline is the star of the show, and the additional elements play supporting roles.

 

Prefer Video? Watch the Video Training

 

 

Make Your Headline Clear and Not Clever

It’s amazing how a few words can cause such havoc, right?

Remember to be clear and not clever–even on your website.

Succinct copywriting takes time and practice.

I would suggest brainstorming a list of headlines.

Pull the best words from your brainstorming exercise, and write your headline.

Be assured, spending time crafting a few words will yield greater results.

As your opt-ins grow your community, you’ll be able to offer your amazing products and service.

Bridge the Gap and Get More Clicks is a Copywriting Checklist that will help you write a stronger sales page.

 

Stay resilient!

Marisa Shadrick

Digital Strategist and Certified Copywriter

More to explorer

30 Copy Tips & Swipe
Canva Digital Course
Schedule a Free Call

Below, Products I Endorse!

Disclosure: The resource links are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. Thank you!

A Planner for Women Click the Image

Online Tools

optimizepress

Affilicate I Use & Endorse!

Mid-Year Planners

Online Tools

Online Tools